Photographic Storytelling Project Checkpoint

dogs_bookWe will wrap up this project by the end of the week. Today we will stay inside, inventory the photos we have taken for our project, refine our project concept (if necessary), and plan the photos we will need to take during the next two classes to finish our project. Since this class struggled with the project proposal assignment, today’s blog post will replace that grade, so make sure you complete all the required part of today’s assignment and post them to the blog. Check your folders to make sure you have been getting credit for each class, and read the comments from Ms. Lawson.

Today’s Assignment:

Part 1: Gathering your best photos. Post the best 20 you have taken for this project to your blog. Then ask your classmates and Ms. Lawson for feedback.

Part 2: Analyzing how your photos tell a story and relate to a particular theme. Answer the following questions:

  • What story or character(s) will you portray with your project?
  • How will the environment contribute to the image? Where will you need to go?
  • What props or costumes will you use?
  • Who will you photograph? What will their body language portray?
  • How do the photos you have taken so far work with this theme?
  • What are some photos you need to take to finish your collection? Where should we go to take these photos?

Here are some Media 3 Projects that are well on their way to success:

No idea where you’re going with this project? Follow Fran’s lead, post what you’ve got, be honest, and we’ll come up with a plan.

Today we will:

  • Post our best 20 photos we have taken for this project to our blog
  • Get feedback on these photos from our classmates and Ms. Lawson
  • Answer the questions in this blog post to analyze how well your photos relate to your intended theme, adjust your project concept if necessary, and brainstorm any remaining photos you will need to take during the next two classes (include models, props, and location)
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Photographic Storytelling: Favorite Student Photos

Here are some of my favorite photos taken the past few classes. How has the photographer created a clear storyline in each photo?

Media 2

Media 3

Today we will:

  • continue taking photos for our storytelling with portraiture project
  • create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos taken today
    • a paragraph describing your concept, what photos you have so far for your concept, and what photos you will need to take over the next few classes to round out your series of ten photos

Social Reportage: Dorothea Lange & Lewis Hine

The social changes of the late 19th century were largely at the expense of the working class and the poor. Documentary photographers Dorothea Lange and Lewis Hine helped raise awareness of disenfranchised populations. As we continue our portraiture unit, take a few minutes to analyze how Dorothea Lange and Lewis Hine captured powerful stories in their portraits.

DOROTHEA LANGE (1895-1965)

Dorothea Lange was an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Lange’s photographs humanized the consequences of the Great Depression and influenced the development of documentary photography. Her photograph, Migrant Mother, is the most famous of the FSA photographs. Lange had promised not to publish the photo and use it only to obtain food. Food was indeed rushed to the camp when bureaucrats saw the images, but two of the pictures were published, and one of them become iconic almost overnight. View more of Dorothea Lange’s work at The History Place and the Museum of Modern Art.

LEWIS HINE (1874-1940)

Though Lewis Hine was a sociologist by trade, his photographs of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island led to a commission from the reforming National Child Labor Committee. Often working undercover or with a false identity, Hine undertook a photographic survey of child labor from 1908-1918, which produced a monumentally damning body of 5,000 images. Hine supported every image with full details of the child, his or her working conditions, and even wages. By 1919, he was receiving recognition as a photographer as well as a reformer, but continued working for government agencies. Sadly, by the late 1930s, his contribution to society was no longer valued and he spent his last days homeless and on welfare. Even his prints were not wanted and were turned down by MoMA. Luckily, the George Eastman house, the world’s oldest photography museum, took them in. See more of Lewis Hine’s work at The History Place and The Getty.

Today we will:

  • Continue taking portraits for our Storytelling with Black & White Portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos you took today
    • a few sentences explaining what went well, as what as what challenges you still face regarding portrait photography

Photographic Storytelling Day 2

Today’s Essential Question: How can I combine models, props/costumes, and environment work together to create an interesting story?

Here are some of my favorite photos taken last class.

Human Subjects:

Plastic Subjects:

Today we will:

  • Take more pictures for our storytelling with black & white portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos we took today
    • a few sentences describing what went well and what you find challenging about portrait photography
  • Clear the memory cards, take the batteries out of the cameras, insert them into a charger, plug the charger into an outlet, and put the camera back in the bag.

Photography Day 1

Today we will begin shooting portraits of people outside. Here are some photos taken by the Media 3 students. How do the models, props/costumes, and environment work together to create an interesting story?

McKenzie: Photos of Friends with Flowers that Represent their Personalities

Quamae: The Elusive American Teenager

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Today we will:

  • Take the first pictures for our storytelling with black & white portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos we took today
    • a few sentences describing what went well and what you find challenging about portrait photography
  • Clear the memory cards, take the batteries out of the cameras, insert them into a charger, plug the charger into an outlet, and put the camera back in the bag.

Featured Photographer: Carrie Mae Weems

Today we will begin shooting portraits of people outside. Take a few minutes now to browse the work of Carrie Mae Weems for inspiration. How do the props and scenery that Weems includes in her photos help tell a more interesting story?

Carrie Mae Weems (born 1953)

weems_self_portraitIn her early twenties, Carrie Mae Weems was politically active in the labor movement as a union organizer. Her first camera, which she received as a birthday gift from her then- boyfriend, was used for this work rather than for artistic purposes. She was inspired to pursue photography only after she came across The Black Photography Annual, a book of images by African-American photographers.

Weems’ award-winning photographs focus on serious issues that face African Americans today, such as racism, gender relations, politics, and personal identity. She has said, “Let me say that my primary concern in art, as in politics, is with the status and place of Afro-Americans in our country.” More recently however, she expressed that “Black experience is not really the main point; rather, complex, dimensional, human experience and social inclusion … is the real point.”

Today we will:

  • Take the first pictures for our storytelling with black & white portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos we took today
    • a few sentences describing what went well and what you find challenging about portrait photography

New Project: Storytelling with Black & White Portraiture

Today we will start our first project of the school year: Storytelling with black and white portraiture. Here are some photos taken by SOTA students that would fulfill project requirements:

How do the props and environment add to the photos?

How will this project prepare us for our film making unit?

Project Requirements:

  • Submit a series of 10 edited black and white photos.
  • Each photo should tell a story or illustrate a character’s personality.
  • The photos should work together as a cohesive series.
  • Photos are technically sound (no over or underexposed areas, image is in focus, etc.)
  • Photos are aesthetically appealing (follow the rule of thirds, visual elements within the photo display unity, clear focal point, etc.)

Project Planning Blog Post:

  • Answer the following questions:
    • What story or character(s) will you portray with your project?
    • How will the environment contribute to the image? Where will you need to go?
    • What props or costumes will you use?
    • Who will you photograph? What will their body language portray?
    • Will you need to sign out a camera to take photos outside of class?
  • Shot list (description of each planned photo) & thumbnail sketches for your 10 photos.
  • If you need ideas, check out the Media 3 project proposals.

We will begin going outside next class. Please come prepared (turn in permission slips, wear appropriate clothing for the weather, bring a camera (if you have one), and have your shots and location planned).

Today we will:

  • introduce the storytelling with black and white portraiture project
  • create a new blog post with our project proposal for the storytelling with black and white portraiture project