Storyboards

Today’s essential question: How can I use a storyboard to plan out my animation?

Today we will create storyboards to plan our Creature Creation animations. It may help to work backwards and draw/photograph each step as you deconstruct your creature.

We will then start shooting the actual animation using the Stikbot Studio app. Pay attention to your background and make sure you are shooting against a solid background! Ms. Lawson has lots of construction paper if you would like to use a specific color for your background.

Here is an example of what I am looking for in a storyboard.
You will also need to include a brief description under each sketch.
storyboard

Today we will:

  • Storyboard our creature creation stop motion animation
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • A photo of our storyboard
    • A brief description of the animation
  • Start photographing our Creature Creation stop motion animations
Advertisements

Going Meta: Creating an Animation about Character Design

Today’s essential questions: What type of character will I design? How will I create it?

Today we will build a character out of polymer clay. We will also storyboard the process of how we created it, and take a few reference photos along the way. Next class, we will go back and create a proper stop motion animation of the character morphing into existence, as in the examples below:

Make a face

Here is an example of what I mean by storyboard sketches for the animation above:

storyboard.jpg

Make a friend

It is easiest if you work in pairs, with one person building the character, and another person photographing and sketching the steps.

Today we will:

  • Build a character out of polymer clay
  • Storyboard the process of how we created it
  • Take reference photos of the character creation process
  • Post the following to our blog:
    • Photos of the character creation process (including a photo of the final completed character)
    • A photo of our storyboard
    • A few sentences describing how you created the character, and what you think will be the easiest and most difficult parts of this process to animate next class

Mini Unit: Stop Motion Animation

Today’s essential question: How can I create the illusion of motion through a series of pictures?

Today we will start our mini stop motion animation unit. We will download the Stikbot Studio App and create a quick 2-3 second animation that looks like an ordinary inanimate object (such as a USB drive, key chain, pen, chapstick, etc) is moving on its own.

This animated keychain is an example of what I am looking for:
animated_keychain.PNG

The StikBot Studio App is set at a default of 10 frames per second. This means that you will need to take 20-30 photos to make your 2-3 second clip. Follow these steps from the iMore website to get started!

Getting started with StikBot Studio

  1. Download and Install StikBot Studio from the App Store.
  2. Tap Open.
  3. Tap the Video Camera icon.
  4. Tap OK to allow access to the camera.

Set your scene

At this point your camera will be enables and ready to start taking photos.

  1. Set you camera on a small stable location like a tripod for best results.
  2. Set up your initial scene.
  3. Tap the red face to take your first shot.
  4. Make a small adjustment to your figure. You’ll see a ghost image of your previous position so that you get the motion “just right”.
  5. Tap the red face to take your next shot. You’ll notice that the ghost image in now gone awaiting your next stop motion movement.
  6. Continue until you have completed your scene.
  7. Once you’ve completed your scene, tap the video editor icon.

Modify your animation

Once you have your desired scene completed, you can add sound effects, dialog, text, and items from your camera roll in the video editor.

  1. Tap the new scene you’ve created.
  2. You can preview your video by tapping the play arrow.
  3. Press the pause button to stop the preview.

Exporting and sharing

Once you’ve completed your awesome animation you’re ready to save and share it!

  1. Tap the export icon.
  2. Tap YES to save your movie to the camera roll.
  3. Choose your video format.
  4. Tap OK to allow StikBot to access your photos.
  5. Tap OK once the export to camera roll is complete.
  6. Go into your Photos.
  7. Tap your movie.
  8. Tap the Share icon.
  9. Select the method your wish to share your video. For this class, you should upload it to YouTube and then post the link to your blog.

The following people still need to create a final infographic blog post with a PNG, PDF, and 150 word artist statement:

  • Exzavier
  • Carla
  • Aiden
  • Narionna

Today we will:

  • Download the StikBot Studio App. If you do not have a SmartPhone, please partner with someone who does.
  • Create a 2-3 second animation showing an inanimate object mysteriously moving across the screen on its own
  • Log in to YouTube using your school Gmail account
  • Post the animation to YouTube
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • A picture/screen shot of one frame of the animation
    • A link to the video
    • The answers to the following questions:
      • Describe what is happening in your animation.
      • How did you create this animation?
      • What was easy? What was difficult?
      • What advice would you give to someone who wants to try stop motion?

Infographic Final Blog Post + Artist Statement

dog_santa_hatFinal Blog Post Requirements

When you are done with your infographic, create a final blog post with the following:

  • a PDF of your finished project
  • a PNG of your finished project (so we can see the image in the blog post).
    To create a PNG from Illustrator, click File -> Save for Web & Devices -> PNG-24
  • a minimum 150-word artist statement about your project. An artist statement (minimum 150 words) about our project. Not sure what to write? Start by answering the following questions:
    • Describe your artwork
      • What does your artwork look like?
      • What art elements or principles are most obvious in your work?
    • What is the big idea behind your artwork?
      • Who or what inspired your artwork?
      • What is your artwork about?
      • How do you want people to feel when they view your artwork?
    • How did you create your art?
      • What media is your artwork made from?
      • Describe the process or steps you took to create your artwork.
    • Overall thoughts
      • What did you learn from creating this artwork?
      • Is the final piece what you imagined? How so?
      • What did you do well? What could you have done better?

Today we will:

  • Create our final blog posts with both PDFs and PNG of our final projects, and a 150-word artist statement about the project

Unity & Contrast

Today’s essential question: How can I simultaneously create unity and contrast in my infographic?

Andrew has successfully created both unity and contrast in his infographic.
What are some ways he has done this?
Examine color scheme, typography, shapes, graphics.

mythical-creatures-project2.png

After today, we will only have two more classes to finish our infographics and write an artist statement about our project. This is means:

  • If you are stuck on what to do to finish your infographic, please call Ms. Lawson over for help THIS CLASS
  • If you do not think you will be able to finish your infographic in time, please schedule a time to work in the art room during lunch or Advisement.

Today we will:

  • Continue working on our infographic projects
  • Create a new blog post with our progress. Include:
    • a PDF of your project
    • a PNG of your project
    • a few sentences explaining how your infographic uses alignment and proximity, or how you can improve the layout by using these principles

Infographics about Infographics

Excellent job with last class’s peer critique! I was impressed with the feedback you gave each other.
Remember to consult this feedback as you continue to work on your projects.

Today we will flex our metacognitive thinking skills by looking at some infographics about infographics.
Click on any given infographic to view it larger:

Infographics don’t necessarily need to be serious:
most-popular-infographics_50290d1739cc0_w587

Today we will:

  • Continue working on our infographic projects
  • Create a new blog post with our progress. Include:
    • a PDF of your project
    • a PNG of your project
    • a few sentences explaining how your infographic uses alignment and proximity, or how you can improve the layout by using these principles

In-Process Critique

Today’s essential questions: What is working on my infographic? What could be improved?

Today we will break into two small groups and critique our infographics so far. As the group is giving you feedback on your infographic, you should be writing their feedback in a new blog post. You should then reference this blog post when you resume working on your infographic, as it will serve as a list of suggestions/changes to make to your infographic.

Here is a sample infographic I made to show the potential changes that could be made through a peer critique:

Peer Critique Questions

Evaluate the infographic on the following categories.
State what is working and what could be improved:

  • Visual Hierarchy
  • Alignment
  • Proximity/Grouping
  • Typography
  • Color Scheme
  • Graphics

Today we will:

  • conduct a model critqiue at the Smart Board as a class
  • break into two groups, and critique each group member’s current infographic
  • publish a new blog post with the feedback received during today’s critique
  • continue working on our infographics, incorporating the feedback from today’s critique
  • add a PDF and PNG of our progress to the blog post with the critique feedback