Sample Infographic Project Proposal

Topic: Life Before Adopting a Pet vs. Life After Adopting a Pet

Style: I will create simple, vector shapes in illustrator. I am hoping to use a few, bright colors against a white background, and use a simple, sans serif typeface such as Arial or Helvetica. One side of the poster will show features of life before a pet, and the other side will show features of life after adopting a pet. Here are examples of the style I am going for:

images infographic-design-geek-nerd

STEAM-not-just-STEM-Infographic-550x575

infographic_designs_1

sport-england-infographic

wedding_infographic

Research: I will consult animal adoptions resources such as the Humane Society, and will also survey my friends who have pets.

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New Project: Infographic

Infographics display information in an attractive way. For our next project, you will create an infographic on a topic of your choice. You will either create a vector infographic in illustrator, or a raster infographic in Photoshop that is made of hand drawn elements.

Project requirements:

  • 11×17″ or 17×11″
  • created in Adobe Illustrator (vector) or Adobe Photoshop (raster)
  • you have created all artwork (photos, drawings, vector graphics)
  • effective use of typography & visual hierarchy
  • displays a cohesive color scheme
  • topic is accurately researched and sources are cited
  • project and artist statement posted to the blog by November 23rd or 24th

Examples of raster infographics (click to enlarge):

evolution-hipster

Evolution-of-a-Hipster_FINAL2015

most_prolific_rappers

ink

guide_to_espresso   heiton   fotoseed   ford-the-road-to-college-1-638

right_vs_left_brain   christmas_dinnner

static1.squarespace.com   nile_inforgraphic

Examples of vector infographics (click to enlarge):

game_of_thrones

seattlemusicalaina.edits4_.17.135.56

Octopus_Infographic_Example1

rich_water_poor_water   world_Education_infographic

london_vs_paris   college_vote   amsterdam
comic_sans  bone-chilling-legends   london coffee_facts

Types of infographics:

  • compare 2 topics (ex. life before a pet, life after a pet; Tupac vs. Kendrick Lamar)
  • all about a topic (ex. graphic design as a career, history of rap music, how to make a pumpkin spice latte)
  • illustrate subcategories within a category (ex. comparison of starbucks drinks, stereotypes of students who go to SOTA, characters featured on Game of Thrones)
  • call attention to a social issue (incarceration rates by race, gender, and income; history of a disenfranchised group (ex. civil rights, gay marriage, feminism; adoption rates of different types of pets in animal shelters)

Today we will:

  • brainstorm various infographic topics
  • consult Ms. Lawson and your classmates on which topics may work the best for this assignment
  • create a new blog post with:
    • your topic
    • the type of infographic you will create to display the information
    • examples of the style of infographic you will create
    • resources you will use to research the information you will display in your infographic

Portrait Photography: Last Day FOR REAL

photographer-cat

Today we will finish our portrait photography unit. Really.

Today we will:

  • Post your 15-20 BEST black and white photos to the blog. Let Ms. Lawson know once you have published these, and she will consult  you on the best ten when she is available.
  • Write an artist statement about the project that is a minimum of 150 words (more is better).
  • AFTER YOU HAVE CONSULTED MS. LAWSON, create one final blog post with your strongest 10 edited photos and your artist statement. If you do not complete this step by the end of today’s class, you must arrange a time to do so.

Exceptions: Brian has completed the project and may have a study hall, Giacomo just needs to add an artist statement to his final photo collection, and Yolie just needs to create a final blog post based on the written feedback.

Portrait Photography: Last Day

cat_as_photographer_by_microkey-d4ydm7b

Today we will finish our portrait photography unit.

If you posted 15-20 black and white photos to the blog last class:

  • Edit your photos according to the instructions I have given you.
  • Publish a blog post with:
    • your final 10 edited black and white photos of people
    • an artist statement about the project that is a minimum of 150 words (more is better)
  • If you have time, comment on a few classmates’ photos. Make sure you check out the photos taken by the other Media class:

If you did not post 15-20 black and white photos to the blog last class:

  • Post 15-20 black and white photos to the blog. Let Ms. Lawson know once you have published these, and she will consult  you on the best ten when she is available.
  • Write an artist statement about the project that is a minimum of 150 words (more is better).
  • If time allows, create one final blog post with your strongest 10 edited photos and your artist statement. If you do not complete this step by the end of today’s class, you must arrange a time to do so.

Portrait Editing Day 1: Converting Favorite 20 Photos to Black & White

We shot our portrait photos in color, but will convert them to black and white. Here are some situations in which you can improve a photograph by converting it to black and white:

To emphasize the lighting (Photo credit: Deanna, class of 2015)

deanna_darren_color   deanna_furia_1

To eliminate distracting colors and create a cohesive color scheme (Photo credit: Ms. Lawson)

IMG_0603   isiah_photography3

To unify a series of photos (Photo credit: Katie, class of 2015)

katie_murrer_1   katie_murrer_3

How to convert your image to black & white:

  1. Image -> Mode -> Gray scale
  2. Image -> Adjustments -> Levels
  3. Look at the image that pops up. If your image has sufficient contrast, the “mountain range” will extend to the edge of the window.
    If your image looks similar to this, you do not need to adjust the levels, and can close out of the window:

    levels_no_adjustment

    If your “mountain range” of values does not extend to the edges of the window (such as the example below), you will click on the left cursor and drag it to the beginning of the left side of the mountain.
    You will then click on the right cursor and drag it to the beginning of the right side of the mountain.
    You will be able to preview what you are doing as long as the “preview” box is checked.

    levels_before_and_after

    When you have adjusted your levels, click ok.

    Save the black and white version of your image.

Today we will:

  • Convert our favorite 20 photos of people to black and white
  • Create a new blog post with the original color photo and the black and white version of each of your favorite 20 photos of people
  • If you have not already done so, complete the composite practice assignment and create a separate blog post with the original photo, the composited photo, and a description of the effects you used.

Editing in Photoshop #2: Compositing to Create Selective Color or Filters

Today we will learn how to use the pen tool to path out part of a photo and copy and paste it on a new layer. This will allow us to edit just that part of the photos. This technique is called compositing, and serves many purpose. For example, sometimes part of an image will already be sufficiently exposed (is bright enough), while part of the image is too dark. In this case, you would want to lighten selective areas of your photo with a technique called compositing. You can also use compositing to put a filter on just one part of your photo.

How to create a composite image:

  1. Go to the “paths” window on the lower right side of the screen. It is likely tabbed next to the layers palette.
    Click the “new path” button. new_path_icon
  2. Go to the toolbar on the left side of the screen. Select the pen tool. pen_tool
    Outline the part of the photograph you want to modify.
  3. Once you have closed your shape by clicking on the first point, go back to the paths window.
    Right click on the path you have created, and click “make selection.”
    make_selection_layers
    Feather the selection by 1pixel (this will soften the edges of your selection).
    It should look like ants are marching around the part of the photo you have selected.
    marching_ants
  4. Control + click to copy your selection. Control + click to paste your selection.
    just_josh
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 until you have pathed out, copied, and pasted all the parts of the photo that you would like to modify.
    just_darren_josh
  6. Now here’s the fun part – modifying each part of the image. Go back to the “layers” window. Click on the layer you want to modify, then at the top of the screen, go to Image -> Adjustments, and select the appropriate adjustment. In this case, I want to make the background black & white, so I clicked on the background layer:
    image_adjustments_bw
    finished_selective_color
  7. Repeat the steps above to individually adjust the levels on each part of your photo that contains unique lighting.
    For example, the people in my photo seem a bit too dark, so I can click on each of their layers in the layers palette, go to Image -> Adjustments -> Levels, and adjust the levels on each person until I am happy with the lighting.
    darren_josh_selective_color_levels

Today we will:

  • Use compositing to selectively edit part of a photo
  • Create a new blog post featuring the before and after of each edited photo.
    Brian did a great job experimenting with different filters on multiple photographs.

Featured Photographer: Carrie Mae Weems

Today we will continue shooting portraits of people outside. Take a few minutes now to browse the work of Carrie Mae Weems for inspiration. How do the props and scenery that Weems includes in her photos help tell a more interesting story?

CARRIE MAE WEEMS (born 1953)

Self Portrait, Carrie Mae Weems

Self Portrait, Carrie Mae Weems

In her early twenties, Carrie Mae Weems was politically active in the labor movement as a union organizer. Her first camera, which she received as a birthday gift from her then- boyfriend, was used for this work rather than for artistic purposes. She was inspired to pursue photography only after she came across The Black Photography Annual, a book of images by African-American photographers.

Weems’ award-winning photographs focus on serious issues that face African Americans today, such as racism, gender relations, politics, and personal identity. She has said, “Let me say that my primary concern in art, as in politics, is with the status and place of Afro-Americans in our country.” More recently however, she expressed that “Black experience is not really the main point; rather, complex, dimensional, human experience and social inclusion … is the real point.”

20140124-weems-slide-n4o2-superjumbo

tumblr_m2m7p9cA0T1rnfwtbo1_1280

delightful-design-of-the-kitchen-which-completed-with-the-long-model-of-the-carrie-mae-weems-kitchen-table-series

CMW__1_Untitled-Man-smoking-HR

Today we will:

  • Continue shooting portraits of people
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos we took today
    • a few sentences describing what went well and what challenges you still face regarding portrait photography