Editing in Premiere: Importing, Cutting, and Arranging Video

Today’s essential question: How can I piece together my video files in Premiere?

Today we will begin combining and editing our video footage in Premiere. Make sure you remember which computer you are working on, as it is extremely difficult to transfer Premiere files between computers.

How to Set Up Your Movie Trailer Project in Premiere:

  1. Open Premiere premiere
  2. Select New Project
  3. Set Up the Project according to these settings (if you used a class video camera).
    This will ensure that your video footage does not get cropped strangely:
    first_Screen
  4. Click OK, then set up the Sequence according to these settings:second_Screen

Importing your movie

  1. File -> Import
  2. Select any video files you wish to import. They will all appear in the top left part of your screen:
    clip_previews
  3. Click on your chosen video file and drag it onto the timeline at the bottom of the screen to add it to your movie sequence:
    timeline_preview
  4. Scroll through the movie to watch it

Cutting your sequence

  1. Select the razor tool from the toolbar on the lower right part of the screen:
    toolbar
  2. In the timeline, click with the razor where you would like to cut your video.
    A line will appear where you made the cut.
  3. Select the black arrow from the toolbar on the lower right part of the screen:
    selection_tool
  4. Click on the part of the sequence that you would like to delete.
    It will turn a darker color:
    delete_selection
  5. Press the “Backspace” or “Delete” keys to delete the selected part of the video file

Continue to add movie clips to your timeline, cut, and rearrange them as necessary.

Today we will:

  • Begin combining and editing our video footage in Premiere
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • a link to our footage so far
    • a brief description of what is going well so far and what you would like help with

 

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Movie Trailer Day 8: Staging Key Scenes

Today’s essential question: What are some differences between a movie and a movie trailer?

As you film your scenes, remember that the assignment is a 60-second movie trailer, not an actual movie. You will want a series of interesting shots, but will not need to use entire scenes. How can you tell if you should use part of a video in your trailer? Pause the video and see if the still image conveys the story on its own. If so, it is interesting enough to make it into the final cut.

Here are some screen shots from videos taken last class. How are the camera angles and camera distance helping to tell the story?

late_passvending_machine

Why is the bird’s eye view awkward for the scene below?

birds_eye_view

Why does this shot of people sitting around a table tell a better story?

library_table.PNG

Ezequiel has shot some great scenes. How are the camera angles and camera distance adding to the quality of the video? What are the most interesting parts of the video that he should use in his trailer?

Remember, we are not filming an entire movie. If you are feeling overwhelmed, you are probably trying to capture too much of the plot. Think of how you can do the least amount of work to get your story across!

Today we will:

  • Continue filming our movie trailers. Focus on filming footage that can be spliced together for the trailer.
    DO NOT try to film an entire movie!
  • Upload any footage we have filmed to our shared Media 2 folder in our Google Drive accounts.
  • Upload the same footage to YouTube.
  • Include Youtube video links to our footage in today’s blog post. If you spent the entire class acting, please post the link to the videos you acted in to receive credit for today’s class.

Movie Trailer Day 7: Video Tips and Common Mistakes

Today’s essential question: How can I avoid common videography mistakes?

Tip 1: Hold your camera in place (rest it on a tripod or surface if possible) and zoom to show movement vs walking/running while holding the camera.

Look at this smooth zoom:

Compared to this not-so-smooth effect:

Tip 2: Use over-the-shoulder shots to show a personal point of view

The fact that we are so close to Ezekiel that we can’t even see what the hand is attached to adds to the suspense/terror of the scene:

Tip 3: Use multiple cameras to show the same scene from multiple points of view. This will allow you to create some great cuts in your trailer.

Just be careful to make sure you can’t see the other camera in the shot!

View point 1:

View Point 2:

If you had trouble uploading videos to YouTube and/or posting links to your blog, please see Ms. Lawson after the SmartBoard Demo so she can help you early on in the class.

Today we will:

  • Continue filming our movie trailers.
  • Upload any footage we have filmed to our shared Media 2 folder in our Google Drive accounts.
  • Upload the same footage to YouTube.
  • Include Youtube video links to our footage in today’s blog post. If you spent the entire class acting, please post the link to the videos you acted in to receive credit for today’s class.

Movie Trailer Day 6: Filming Video

Movie-Director-Dog-42042556Today’s essential question: Why is it important to post our videos to our blogs at the end of each class?

Today we will continue filming our videos. In order to receive participation points for today, you must publish a blog post with ALL videos you filmed or acted in during today’s class. You will have to first upload the videos to YouTube, and then post the link to the YouTube video on your class blog. You should also upload your video footage to your shared Media 2 folder in your Google Drive. This means you should return to the classroom between 8:40 and 8:45 to make sure you have enough time to do all of this.

Hsa’s blog post from last class is exactly what I am looking for. What are some things that are working well with these videos? What are some things that could be improved?

Today we will:

  • Continue filming our movie trailers.
  • Upload any footage we have filmed to our shared Media 2 folder in our Google Drive accounts.
  • Upload the same footage to YouTube.
  • Include Youtube video links to our footage in today’s blog post. If you spent the entire class acting, please post the link to the videos you acted in to receive credit for today’s class.

Movie Trailer Day 5: Staging and Camera Angles

Today’s essential question: How can how I frame my shot and angle the camera affect how my scene is portrayed?

Today we will begin filming. Ms. Lawson must have approved your project proposal script + photos in order for you to film your trailer. (You may act in a classmate’s trailer but you are not allowed to film your own until you have properly submitted a project proposal.)

Note: You must carry press passes with you at all times. Anyone caught without a press pass will lose the privilege of leaving the classroom and will have to do an alternate assignment.

What are some reasons these still frames are successful?

Today we will:

  • Begin filming our movie trailers.
  • Upload any footage we have filmed to our shared Media 2 folder in our Google Drive accounts.
  • Upload the same footage to YouTube.
  • Include Youtube video links to our footage in today’s blog post. If you spent the entire class acting, please post the link to the videos you acted in to receive credit for today’s class.

Movie Trailer Day 4: Beginning Filming

dog_video_camera.jpgToday we will review the requirements for the project proposal blog post, finish our project proposals, and then begin filming our movie trailers. Although Rae’s project proposal is not yet finished, it is a good example of the structure I am looking for.

Please check the progress report in your folder. Most of this class is oblivious as to how their lack of classwork has affected their grade. We will have Art Education graduate students observing our next two classes (Wednesday and Friday). Please represent this class in a positive manner.

The following people should meet with me at the beginning of class to discuss what changes they need to make to receive full credit for their project proposals (must include script with narrator voiceover and at least 5 still photos). After publishing a new blog post with these changes, they may begin filming their movie trailers: Shaborn, Eh Tha, Jaden, Mason, Rae, Carleton, Sylena, Hsa Doe. Everyone else should continue working on their scripts + still photos, publishing a completed project proposal with both of these pieces to their blogs by the end of today’s class.

Today we will:

  • Check the progress reports in our folders.
  • Finish our movie trailer project proposals. For full credit, these must include:
    • script with narrator voiceover
    • at least 5 still photos of the key scenes/action
  • Begin filming our movie trailer project proposals.
  • Upload any footage we have filmed to our shared Media 2 folder in our Google Drive accounts.
  • Upload the same footage to YouTube.
  • Include Youtube video links to our footage in today’s blog post.

 

Movie Trailer Day 3: Shooting Film Stills

Today’s essential question: How can I frame well-designed shots in my movie trailer?

Featured Artist: Wes Anderson

Director Wes Anderson is known for his well-designed frames. You can stop one of his movies at any point, and it will look like a well staged photograph. Check out the examples below.

What photography techniques has he used in his films?

Moonrise Kingdom

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Today we will shoot photos to go along with the script. By the end of today’s class, you should publish a blog post with 5-10 still photos and a script to go along with those photos. (You can copy and paste the script from last class’s blog post.) Include links to any music you plan to incorporate. Use Dallas’s blog post as a guideline of what I am looking for.

Make sure you take a photo of every major part of your trailer in its intended location. (For example, if a serial killer stabs someone in the Media classroom, you need to take a photo of your serial killer character pretending to stab that person in this classroom. The point of the photo assignment is to make sure your intended characters and locations work the way you think they will.)

Today we will:

  • Discuss how to frame well-designed cinematic shots
  • Shoot 5-10 still photos that will serve as a storyboard for your movie
  • Publish a blog post with the following:
    • 5-10 still photos showing how you will stage the various parts of your movie trailer. Include a closing screen.
    • You will insert each photo alongside the relevant part of your actual script/voiceover. If you plan to use background music, name which part of which song you plan to use and why.