Photographic Storytelling: Favorite Student Photos

Here are some of my favorite photos taken the past few classes. How has the photographer created a clear storyline in each photo?

Media 2

Media 3

Today we will:

  • continue taking photos for our storytelling with portraiture project
  • create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos taken today
    • a paragraph describing your concept, what photos you have so far for your concept, and what photos you will need to take over the next few classes to round out your series of ten photos
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Social Reportage: Dorothea Lange & Lewis Hine

The social changes of the late 19th century were largely at the expense of the working class and the poor. Documentary photographers Dorothea Lange and Lewis Hine helped raise awareness of disenfranchised populations. As we continue our portraiture unit, take a few minutes to analyze how Dorothea Lange and Lewis Hine captured powerful stories in their portraits.

DOROTHEA LANGE (1895-1965)

Dorothea Lange was an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Lange’s photographs humanized the consequences of the Great Depression and influenced the development of documentary photography. Her photograph, Migrant Mother, is the most famous of the FSA photographs. Lange had promised not to publish the photo and use it only to obtain food. Food was indeed rushed to the camp when bureaucrats saw the images, but two of the pictures were published, and one of them become iconic almost overnight. View more of Dorothea Lange’s work at The History Place and the Museum of Modern Art.

LEWIS HINE (1874-1940)

Though Lewis Hine was a sociologist by trade, his photographs of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island led to a commission from the reforming National Child Labor Committee. Often working undercover or with a false identity, Hine undertook a photographic survey of child labor from 1908-1918, which produced a monumentally damning body of 5,000 images. Hine supported every image with full details of the child, his or her working conditions, and even wages. By 1919, he was receiving recognition as a photographer as well as a reformer, but continued working for government agencies. Sadly, by the late 1930s, his contribution to society was no longer valued and he spent his last days homeless and on welfare. Even his prints were not wanted and were turned down by MoMA. Luckily, the George Eastman house, the world’s oldest photography museum, took them in. See more of Lewis Hine’s work at The History Place and The Getty.

Today we will:

  • Continue taking portraits for our Storytelling with Black & White Portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos you took today
    • a few sentences explaining what went well, as what as what challenges you still face regarding portrait photography

Photographic Storytelling Day 2

Today’s Essential Question: How can I combine models, props/costumes, and environment work together to create an interesting story?

Here are some of my favorite photos taken last class.

Human Subjects:

Plastic Subjects:

Today we will:

  • Take more pictures for our storytelling with black & white portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos we took today
    • a few sentences describing what went well and what you find challenging about portrait photography
  • Clear the memory cards, take the batteries out of the cameras, insert them into a charger, plug the charger into an outlet, and put the camera back in the bag.

Photography Day 1

Today we will begin shooting portraits of people outside. Here are some photos taken by the Media 3 students. How do the models, props/costumes, and environment work together to create an interesting story?

McKenzie: Photos of Friends with Flowers that Represent their Personalities

Quamae: The Elusive American Teenager

6176680608_img_1252

Today we will:

  • Take the first pictures for our storytelling with black & white portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos we took today
    • a few sentences describing what went well and what you find challenging about portrait photography
  • Clear the memory cards, take the batteries out of the cameras, insert them into a charger, plug the charger into an outlet, and put the camera back in the bag.

Featured Photographer: Carrie Mae Weems

Today we will begin shooting portraits of people outside. Take a few minutes now to browse the work of Carrie Mae Weems for inspiration. How do the props and scenery that Weems includes in her photos help tell a more interesting story?

Carrie Mae Weems (born 1953)

weems_self_portraitIn her early twenties, Carrie Mae Weems was politically active in the labor movement as a union organizer. Her first camera, which she received as a birthday gift from her then- boyfriend, was used for this work rather than for artistic purposes. She was inspired to pursue photography only after she came across The Black Photography Annual, a book of images by African-American photographers.

Weems’ award-winning photographs focus on serious issues that face African Americans today, such as racism, gender relations, politics, and personal identity. She has said, “Let me say that my primary concern in art, as in politics, is with the status and place of Afro-Americans in our country.” More recently however, she expressed that “Black experience is not really the main point; rather, complex, dimensional, human experience and social inclusion … is the real point.”

Today we will:

  • Take the first pictures for our storytelling with black & white portraiture project
  • Create a new blog post with the following:
    • the best photos we took today
    • a few sentences describing what went well and what you find challenging about portrait photography

New Project: Storytelling with Black & White Portraiture

Today we will start our first project of the school year: Storytelling with black and white portraiture. Here are some photos taken by SOTA students that would fulfill project requirements:

How do the props and environment add to the photos?

How will this project prepare us for our film making unit?

Project Requirements:

  • Submit a series of 10 edited black and white photos.
  • Each photo should tell a story or illustrate a character’s personality.
  • The photos should work together as a cohesive series.
  • Photos are technically sound (no over or underexposed areas, image is in focus, etc.)
  • Photos are aesthetically appealing (follow the rule of thirds, visual elements within the photo display unity, clear focal point, etc.)

Project Planning Blog Post:

  • Answer the following questions:
    • What story or character(s) will you portray with your project?
    • How will the environment contribute to the image? Where will you need to go?
    • What props or costumes will you use?
    • Who will you photograph? What will their body language portray?
    • Will you need to sign out a camera to take photos outside of class?
  • Shot list (description of each planned photo) & thumbnail sketches for your 10 photos.
  • If you need ideas, check out the Media 3 project proposals.

We will begin going outside next class. Please come prepared (turn in permission slips, wear appropriate clothing for the weather, bring a camera (if you have one), and have your shots and location planned).

Today we will:

  • introduce the storytelling with black and white portraiture project
  • create a new blog post with our project proposal for the storytelling with black and white portraiture project

Welcome to Media 2!

Welcome to the Media2! In this class, we will explore a range of digital art techniques, including digital photography, digital illustration and digital painting, graphic design, video, and animation.

Today we will go over the course criteria sheet, look at some of Ms. Lawson’s artwork, and set up our class blogs and Media folders in Google Drive. By the end of this class you should:

  • set up your class blog
  • email Ms. Lawson the link to your class blog from your school Gmail account
  • publish your first blog post
  • create a shared Media2 folder in your school Google Drive account

Ms. Lawson’s Artwork

Computer Art
Drawing
Animation

Snore Animation

Why is it important to be skilled with a variety of art materials and styles?

What will we do this year?

Here is an overview of potential projects we may complete this year. I am open to suggestions as well!

Setting Up Our Class Blogs

Everyone will make a new blog URL for this class. (You can have multiple blogs under the same WordPress account, so if you already have a WordPress account, log into it, and then come up with a new name for your Media3 blog.)

Part 1A (If you do not have a WordPress account from Foundations 1 or 2): Setting up a WordPress account
  1. Click here to set up a WordPress account. (This will be your Media 2 class blog.) You may choose any free template you like, but keep in mind that you will need to post both text and images, so you should pick a template that supports both of these requirements well.Use your school Gmail address (890….@rcsd121.org) – you will have to verify your email in order to publish blog posts.
  2. Go to Part2 (logging into your district Gmail account).
Part 1B (If you have a WordPress account from Foundations 1): Creating a new blog within an existing WordPress account
  1. Go to wordpress.com and log into your account. Your email address should be your student ID # @rcsd121.org.
  2. Click on “My Sites” at the top left side of the screen. 
  3. Scroll all the way to the bottom and select “WP Admin”
  4. Click on “My blogs”
  5. Click “Register another blog” at the bottom of the screen.
  6. Follow the prompts to set up a new blog.
  7. Go to Part2 (logging into your district Gmail account).

Part 2: Logging into your district Gmail account

  1. Click here to log into your district Gmail account. Your username will be your student ID # @rcsd121.org.) Ex. 8123456@rcsd121.org, and your password is your district computer password. (Your district gmail account has unlimited storage space and will give you access to DropBox, which is a great free way to back up your files.)
  2. Open the email from WordPress, and click on the link to verify your email address.
  3. Email Ms. Lawson (2013045 at rcsd121.org) from your district Gmail account.  You will not receive credit if you email me from another email client. Your email should include:
    1. Your first and last name
    2. A link to your WordPress blog. For example, “Stephanie Lawson – My blog URL is SOTAfoundations2.wordpress.com.”

Part 3: Publishing your first blog post

Publish your first post by clicking on this icon at the top of your WordPress screen Screen Shot 2015-07-09 at 9.49.23 AM
Include the following:

  1. Post an image by following these steps:
    1. Go to images.google.com
    2. type in what you are looking for (ex. “cutest kitten in the world”)
    3. click on the image you want to download
    4. control +click -> save images as
    5. save the image to your desktop
    6. Click on the “add media” button Screen Shot 2015-07-09 at 9.50.16 AM
    7. Click on “upload files” Screen Shot 2015-07-09 at 9.51.03 AM
    8. Click on “select file” Screen Shot 2015-07-09 at 9.51.20 AM
  2. Select the image you want to insert
  3. Write a paragraph with the answers to the following questions:
    1. Describe your previous experience with computer art.
    2. Whose is responsible if the computer crashes and your project disappears? What will happen?
    3. How will you back up your work? (hint: blog, Google Drive)
    4. Why is it important to make a blog post every day?
  4. Click “publish” at the bottom of the screen to publish your post. Screen Shot 2015-07-09 at 10.12.00 AM
  5. If you have time, help your classmates set up their blogs.

Part4: Creating a Shared Media Folder in Google Drive

  1. Log into your school Gmail account. (Username: student # @rcsd121.org; Password: same password you use to log into the school computers.)
  2. Click on the squares in the top right corner of the screen and select Drive
    google_drive
  3. Click on “New” on the top left side of the screen and then “Folder” from the drop down menu to create a new folder
    new_folder
  4. Name your folder “LastName_FirstInitial_Media2”
    new_folder_name
  5. Right click on the folder and select “Share.”
    share_folder
  6. Share the folder with me and make sure you give me permission to add items.
    folder_permissions

Need help? Please follow the following process:

  1. Check the blog
  2. Ask two classmates
  3. Still stuck? Raise your hand and Ms. Lawson will help you as soon as she is available.

Today we will:

  • Go over the Course Criteria Sheet
  • Look at some of Ms. Lawson’s artwork & preview projects we will work on this year
  • Set up your class blog
  • Email Ms. Lawson the link to your class blog from your school Gmail account
  • Publish your first blog post
  • Create a shared Media2 folder in your school Google Drive account